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Kings of Funk, Disc 2:BBE

Artist: Various Artists

Date Released: February 15, 2005

Label: BBE/Rapster

Compiled By: Keb Darge

Tracklisting:

  1. Sharon Jones & the Dap-Kings - Genuine
  2. Quantic feat. Spanky Wilson - With a Hungry Man
  3. MFSB - Family Affair
  4. Brand New - Party Time
  5. Mighty Generation - The MG Beat
  6. Zebra - Simple Song
  7. Madcliff - You Can Make the Change
  8. Skying High - Getting Off on Your Loving
  9. Anna Raye - Will You Love My Child
  10. Dee Edwards - (I Can) Deal With That

ReviewEdit

How can you not like funk? It’s upbeat, irresistibly danceable, soulful and packed to the brim with unrelenting energy and emotion. The predominately African-American genre acted as a deeply necessary stress-reliever during the late 60s and into the 70s as racial tensions boiled with the civil rights movement. Replacing the hot jazz of the earlier generations, funk acted not only as the soundtrack for most black Americans, but also acted as a very powerful political voice, which was impossible to ignore. It’s hard to hate on the resurgence of deep funk, the unpolished, raw form of the genre, in recent years thanks to fantastic compilations from labels like Los Angeles’ Now Again and the U.K.’s BBE. This is the second disc from the funk installment of Rapster/BBE’s ‘The Kings of…’ series, selected and mixed by Keb Darge, an influential Scot who has been leading the Northern soul movement in the U.K. through his all-night club shake-downs and rare cut compilations. The album kicks off with an absolutely kickin’ track from the first lady of modern funk and the female equivalent of James Brown, Sharon Jones. It’s followed by what could be the first classic track from the deep funk revival, With a Hungry Man, care of Will Holland, the extraordinary producer and programmer who goes by Quantic, and Ms. Spanky Wilson, a powerful soul soprano who has sang with the likes of Jimmy McGriff, Willie Bobo and more. The rest of the tracks are various vintage deep funk cuts from forgotten names like Madcliff, Skying High and Dee Edwards, save MFSB, which was the leading instrumental outfit of Philly soul who recorded the theme song to Soul Train. There is not a disappointing cut on here as Darge brings his A-game from start to finish and is a necessary listen for new and old fans of the many different styles of funk. Mpardaiolo

Further readingEdit

(links to websites, additional reviews, fansites, books, periodicals or any additional information on the album)

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